Giant Canadian Geese

Giant Canadian Geese

The Giant Canadian Goose is a subspecies of the Canada Goose, native to arctic and temperate regions of North America, and having a characteristic black head and neck, white patches on the face, and a grayish-brown body. The maxima, or Giant, was considered extinct in the 1950s until a discovery of isolated populations was made in Minnesotain the 1960s. The Giant Canada Goose has since been reintroduced and still being widespread through Mississippi Valley and Western states. Today Canada Geese are found in various North American regions, as well as northern Europe, eastern Siberia, eastern China, and all over Japan.

These giant geese have a wingspan of around 6 feet and can weigh up to 20 pounds. They are primarily herbivores with a diet of mostly vegetation (grasses and seaweed) and grains (wheat, beans, rice and corn), although they will sometimes eat fish and insects. The geese are monogamous, and most couples stay together for life. Females lay 3-8 eggs and adults molt annually during the summer/breeding season, regaining flight around the same time their goslings learn to fly. In the wild, the life span of geese that survive to adulthood ranges 10–24 years.